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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
and be in complete wilderness. i really like that about this. you could maybe get a little snapshot of what they are expecting. >> it is an interactive, keck sculpture that is interacted with by the visitor. >> they are a lot about and they fall down the belt. it moves the belt up, and if you turn that faster, the butterflies fall in the move of words. >> the art reflect the commission's commitment to acquiring the best work from the bay area and beyond. in addition to the five new commissions, 20 artworks that were already in the airport collection were reinstalled. some of which were historically cited in the terminal. it includes major sculptures by the international artists. as a collection, these art works tell the story of the vibrant arts scene in the early 1960's through the mid-1980s's. the illustrate san francisco's cultural center and a place of innovation that is recognized and the love throughout the world. one of the highlights is a series of three left tapestries. they are on view after being in storage for 20 years. these tapestries representing various gardens. from his yea
officers with a wilderness program. there are a number of things in the organization in place to start to make change. we have seen this over the last three or four years. in 2008 there were 98 homicides in san francisco. the number is now almost half. i think we continue to see that, as we work with the community. in closing, i want to say that your task force, they do an amazing job. they have the community aspect of this. they're out on the streets, and we will continue to build those relationships as long as we have this in place. thank you. [applause] >> gino, you grteew up in the ba area. -- bay area. how do you determine the gang? and what makes a person a gang member. >> we grew up in the city of richmond. we are known for violence.
wilder, i'm the emergency management coordinate roar at san francisco general trauma center and i'm also representing the san francisco council of emergency partnership which is the group of emergency management coordinators from each of the hospitals throughout san francisco who mead regularly with dph and dem to plan and prepare for our medical response. >> as rob mentioned earlier, one of the primary reasons for the medical exchange is to get an understanding of the capabilities, what can the military bring and what are some of the challenges that we as civilians are going to face when we have this large number of casualties. so what i'd like to hear from our civilian panelists is what were some of our observations about the capabilities the military demonstrated down at moffatt >> i think one of the challenges the city faces in a big medical surge event is if patients have to be evacuated and the bridges were out and how would we do that? yesterday we saw a wide range of patient movement vehicles, basically, and it was great to see all those resources and be aware of them. we saw th
and demonstrated those capabilities. miss wilder, earlier on you said game changing was a way to describe that. how do you feel being more aware of those assets and what they can do will affect your planning? >> it really has changed. i can tell you on the bus coming back from the actual exercise event and the exchange event, there were so many discussions about what we can do differently and how we can change our plans so that there are more options, different ways we can look at which hospitals are still standing and what capabilities they have and then how to augment those and supplement with strategic use of state and dod resources. and really looking at how can we make the best possible care system stand and deliver after a catastrophic earthquake. and that was extraordinary. it was really, you know, it changed the perspective. if you understand most hospitals deal with short term emergencies, we have things that happen that are usually 4 to 12 hours in length for the most part except for h1n1, which was so prolonged that it actually was a very different type of response for us. but a
the gaps are and what we need to do to smooth those out. i'll also reference lan wilder if i can. she said something that was pretty revealing. prior to yesterday and getting out on the beach and seeing us, her thinking was just to ride out the disaster. now she feels like she's in a position where she can do some strategic thinking and strategic planning, which is really an obligation for all of us in charge. as captain jones said earlier this morning, we do not know what this is going to look like and it's certainly not going to look like what we anticipate. but having us understand how to react and how to interact with each other will give us a basis upon which we can go forward and move hopefully very quickly to salvage what we can in the event of a complex catastrophe. thank you. >> and admiral zukunft, we heard a little about from captain stow about the different authorities that the coast guard can bring to bear in different situations. but could you talk a little bit about the partnerships and relationship and how that plays across the coast guard mission set? >> well, first i'll t
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)